The WBGO News Team won seven national and four state awards over the weekend!  WBGO won a total of seven awards, including four first place, in PRNDI's (Public Radio News Directors Incorporated) Division "C" category for newsrooms with 3 full-timers or less. The goal of the PRNDI awards is to honor the best in local public radio. This year's annual PRNDI Awards Banquet was held in Florida Saturday night.  More than 200 journalists attended the conference in Sunny Isles Beach, Florida. 

courtesy of the Artist

Roscoe Mitchell, “EP 7849”

The composer, multi-instrumentalist and educator Roscoe Mitchell has been a profound force in American experimental music for more than half a century – since the earliest stirrings of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, in the mid-1960s. His new double album is Bells For the South Side, recorded at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and just out on ECM.

Rob Davidson

Erroll Garner, the irrepressibly ebullient pianist, left an influence that runs deep but often diffuse: it isn't often that you hear someone who sounds just like him, but there's an awful lot of him in the language. Consider an exchange at our recent Yamaha Salon Concert between Kenny Werner and Andy Milne — a pair of super-literate, restlessly imaginative pianists, a generation apart. Their performance conjured Garner in spirit, without resorting to imitative devices, and set a high bar for responsive duologue.

When Steve Slagle named his new album Alto Manhattan, he had two connotations in mind. The first, of course, refers to his instrument, alto saxophone. But he was also thinking of the neighborhood where he lives, known to its Latino residents as "Alto Manhattan," or "The Heights." 

The album features a special guest, saxophonist Joe Lovano, as well as the percussionist Román Díaz, the drummer Bill Stewart, the bassist Gerald Cannon and the pianist Lawrence Fields. Slagle came into our studio to talk about the album, and play some music with Fields. The full band (sans Lovano) performs tonight at the Jazz Standard.

Metin Oner

The Microscopic Septet, a mid-size jazz combo with orchestral ambitions, has lived through many eras of jazz, beginning in New York City in the early 1980s. Back then, the band became a centerpiece in the city's downtown scene with John Zorn (an original member), Wayne Horwitz, and The Jazz Passengers. 

Its co-leader, Phillip Johnston, said he wanted to create music "too smooth for the avant-garde yet too knotty for the masses." In this Checkout studio session, they play the blues — as on their latest album, Been Up So Long, It Looks Like Down To Me.

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WBGO Member Event

Benny Golson & Jimmy Heath: Meeting of the Maestros at 92Y

WBGO News

After a year of research, the New Jersey Campus Sexual Assault Task Force has issued a 39-page report on steps colleges must take to make campuses safer.

Patricia Teffenhart is executive director of the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault and the co-chair of the task force.  She says the recommendations include having every college conduct a sexual violence climate survey to get information from students, faculty and staff.

Students should know where they can confidentially report a sexual assault and have access to counseling and services.

Al Antomattei / WBGO

Nico Hischier is soaking in the celebrity that comes with being a New Jersey Devil.

“I knew it from the beginning that I’m joining a great organization with a lot of history.  I’m really happy to be a Devil,” said Hischier.  “After being drafted, it’s been crazy.  I can’t really believe it.  It’s one thing to the other and it’s just amazing to be here and special.  When I stepped into the rink it’s pretty cool and the locker room is awesome as well.”

New Jersey Devils coach John Hynes welcomes the 18-year-old Swiss player.

Summer movies are about heroes. And in this hyper-sharpened environment of the performance arts, apparently it takes one to know one. This is the season of Hollywood hero movies, which… I mostly skip. What’s Tom Cruise in the Mummy got to say to me? Worse, last week he said he was going to do a Top Gun sequel. He’s 54 now. He was 23 the first time out. What will they call this one, Shogun… or No Gun? Then there’s Transformers: The Last Knight, which I recall vigorously defending first as a toy in 1985 to fellow parents of toddlers and later as a film, 87 installments ago.

Newark Public Library

Life-long Newark resident Richard Cammarieri was a teenager in the city's central ward in 1967.  

"There was a sense that things were quite inferment throughout the 60's if you were paying any attention at all,"  Cammarieri said.  "My father worked in a town not too far from Newark.  I recall drving with him one day to work.  It was probably the second day.  Because we were white, we were able to pass through the road blocks and cross checks without any problem.  Other cars being stopped had black drivers.  Both men and women, old and young, it didn't seem to matter."

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